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dc.contributor.authorAbotsi, Anselm Komla*
dc.contributor.authorInkoom, Ebenezer*
dc.contributor.authorRibaira, Eric*
dc.contributor.authorLe Mentec, Rozenn*
dc.contributor.authorLévy, Pierre*
dc.contributor.authorLafarge, Hervé*
dc.contributor.authorde Sousa, Alexandra*
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-17T09:57:38Z
dc.date.available2012-09-17T09:57:38Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.issn2278-1005
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/9997
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectMalaria
dc.subjectdirect delivery cost
dc.subjecteconomic cost
dc.subjectcost effectiveness analysis
dc.subjectincremental costs
dc.subjectindirect delivery cost
dc.subjectintermittent preventive treatment in infants
dc.subjecthealth outcome
dc.subject.ddc334en
dc.subject.classificationjelI.I1.I18en
dc.subject.classificationjelI.I1.I11en
dc.titleCost Effectiveness of Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria in Infants in Ghana
dc.typeArticle accepté pour publication ou publié
dc.contributor.editoruniversityotherSocial Science Department, University of Education, Winneba;Ghana
dc.description.abstractenAim: In order to integrate malaria Intermittent Preventive Treatment in infants (IPTi) into the Ghana national immunization programme, there was the need to evaluate the feasibility of IPTi by assessing the intervention operational issues including its implementation costs, and its cost effectiveness. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Upper East Region, Ghana, between July 2007 and July 2009 Methods: We calculated the costs of administrating IPTi during vaccination sessions; the costs of programme implementation during the first year of implementation (start-up costs) and in routine years (recurrent costs). For the purposes of cost-effectiveness analysis, all economic costs (including financial and opportunity costs) and the net cost were estimated. To estimate the cost effectiveness ratios of IPTi, the aggregate cost of providing the intervention for a reference target population of 1,000 infants was divided by its health outcome. Sensitivity analyses were carried out to understand the results robustness. Results: IPTi gross costs in start up and in routine years were estimated at 70.66 cents and 29.72 cents per dose, or $2.0 and $0.87 per infant, respectively. The gross cost per DALY saved was estimated at $3.49 and the net cost of IPTi for 1,000 infants was $-3,416.38 in the routine years rending IPTi a highly cost saving intervention. Sensitivity analyses showed that the cost per DALY saved never went up more than $4.50 maintaining the intervention still highly cost effective. Conclusion: IPTi in Ghana is a highly and robust cost effective intervention. The intervention is cost-saving and should be scaled up nationally to save children’s health and economic capital.
dc.relation.isversionofjnlnameInternational Journal of Tropical Disease & Health
dc.relation.isversionofjnlvol2
dc.relation.isversionofjnlissue1
dc.relation.isversionofjnldate2012
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpages1-15
dc.relation.isversionofdoi10.9734/IJTDH/2012/1017
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpublisherSciencedomain International
dc.subject.ddclabelEconomie socialeen
dc.relation.forthcomingnonen
dc.relation.forthcomingprintnonen
dc.description.ssrncandidatenon
dc.description.halcandidateoui
dc.description.readershiprecherche
dc.description.audienceInternational
dc.relation.Isversionofjnlpeerreviewedoui
dc.date.updated2016-03-25T11:05:20Z
hal.person.labIds230533*
hal.person.labIds230533*
hal.person.labIds20706*
hal.person.labIds135484*
hal.person.labIds163517$$$163511*
hal.person.labIds163511*
hal.person.labIds20706*
hal.identifierhal-01293706*


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