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dc.contributor.authorMilcent, Carine
HAL ID: 170811
ORCID: 0000-0002-9367-2716
*
hal.structure.identifier
dc.contributor.authorDormont, Brigitte*
hal.structure.identifier
dc.contributor.authorDurand-Zaleski, Isabelle*
hal.structure.identifier
dc.contributor.authorSteg, Philippe Gabriel*
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-10T14:47:07Z
dc.date.available2011-01-10T14:47:07Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.issn0009-7322
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/5424
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectacute myocardial infarction gender
dc.subjectrevascularization
dc.subjectmortality
dc.subject.ddc334en
dc.subject.classificationjelJ16en
dc.subject.classificationjelI19en
dc.titleGender differences in hospital mortality and use of percutaneous coronary intervention in acute myocardial infarction : microsimulation analysis of the 1999 nationwide french hospitals database
dc.typeArticle accepté pour publication ou publié
dc.contributor.editoruniversityotherParis-Jourdan Sciences Economiques;France
dc.description.abstractenBackground— Women with acute myocardial infarction have a higher hospital mortality rate than men. This difference has been ascribed to their older age, more frequent comorbidities, and less frequent use of revascularization. The aim of this study is to assess these factors in relation to excess mortality in women.Methods and Results— All hospital admissions in France with a discharge diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction were extracted from the national payment database. Logistic regression on mortality was performed for age, comorbidities, and coronary interventions. Nonparametric microsimulation models estimated the percutaneous coronary intervention and mortality rates that women would experience if they were "treated like men." Data were analyzed from 74 389 patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction, 30.0% of whom were women. Women were older (75 versus 63 years of age; P<0.001) and had a higher rate of hospital mortality (14.8% versus 6.1%; P<0.0001) than men. Percutaneous coronary interventions were more frequent in men (7.4% versus 4.8%; 24.4% versus 14.2% with stent; P<0.001). Mortality adjusted for age and comorbidities was higher in women (P<0.001), with an excess adjusted absolute mortality of 1.95%. Simulation models related 0.46% of this excess to reduced use of procedures. Survival benefit related to percutaneous coronary intervention was lower among women.Conclusions— The difference in mortality rate between men and women with acute myocardial infarction is due largely to the different age structure of these populations. However, age-adjusted hospital mortality was higher for women and was associated with a lower rate of percutaneous coronary intervention. Simulations suggest that women would derive benefit from more frequent use of percutaneous coronary intervention, although these procedures appear less protective in women than in men.
dc.relation.isversionofjnlnameCirculation
dc.relation.isversionofjnlvol115
dc.relation.isversionofjnlissue7
dc.relation.isversionofjnldate2007
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpages833-839
dc.relation.isversionofdoihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.106.664979
dc.description.sponsorshipprivateouien
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpublisherAmerican Heart Association
dc.subject.ddclabelEconomie socialeen
dc.description.ssrncandidatenon
dc.description.halcandidateoui
dc.description.readershiprecherche
dc.description.audienceInternational
dc.relation.Isversionofjnlpeerreviewedoui
dc.date.updated2019-09-25T13:20:35Z
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