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dc.contributor.authorde Vaujany, François-Xavier
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-06T12:04:16Z
dc.date.available2010-10-06T12:04:16Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/4907
dc.descriptionTexte librement accessible sur le site de l'éditeuren
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectepistemologyen
dc.subjectSociologyen
dc.subjectmanagementen
dc.subjectsociotechnical approachesen
dc.subjectresearchen
dc.subjectIS research
dc.subjectIS management
dc.subjectSociology of IS
dc.subjectIT conceptualization
dc.subject.ddc658en
dc.subject.classificationjelM1en
dc.subject.classificationjelM10
dc.titleInformation Technology Conceptualization: Respective Contributions of Sociology and Information Systemsen
dc.typeArticle accepté pour publication ou publié
dc.description.abstractenThis article analyzes the different phases the Information Systems--Sociology relationship has gone through and points out some specific features of sociologists and Information Systems scientists in their conceptualization of Information Technology (IT). It shows that both academic fields develop more and more convergent theorizations. The first part is centered on an historical analysis of sociology itself. It shows the great comeback of the Object within the sociological field at the beginning of the 80s. Different models have been developed from the generalized kinds of sociology to those that have been focused on the social construction of the Object. These make up sociological groups, which we call "autonomous". The second part presents the sociological approaches used and worked out in the domain of Information Systems (IS). These are presented by means of three historical moments (causalist, actor-based and processual). For each of these stages the influence of sociologies, notably those that deal with the Object, is obvious and models are more or less "illuminated" by means of broader perspectives. In the third part, there is a discussion of ontological differences between the work of sociologists studying IS objects and the work of IS researchers drawing on sociologists’ conceptual contributions. Lastly, it seems that if sociology and Information Systems sometimes diverge in the way they study sociotechnical systems, they converge gradually in their conceptualization of the IT artifact.en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlnameJournal of Information Technology Impact
dc.relation.isversionofjnlvol5en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlissue1en
dc.relation.isversionofjnldate2005
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpages39-58en
dc.identifier.urlsitehttp://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00644428
dc.description.sponsorshipprivateouien
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpublisherJITIen
dc.subject.ddclabelGestion des entreprisesen


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