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dc.contributor.authorVille, Isabelle
dc.contributor.authorJusot, Florence
dc.contributor.authorKhlat, Myriam
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-15T08:17:36Z
dc.date.available2009-06-15T08:17:36Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/265
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectGenreen
dc.subjectObésitéen
dc.subjectOrigine socialeen
dc.subjectEconomie de la santéen
dc.subjectEarly hardship
dc.subjectGender
dc.subjectFamily history
dc.subjectSocial origins
dc.subjectBody mass index (BMI)
dc.subjectObesity
dc.subjectFrance
dc.subject.ddc334en
dc.subject.classificationjelJ16en
dc.subject.classificationjelI10en
dc.subject.classificationjelI19en
dc.subject.classificationjelI18en
dc.titleSocial origins, early hardship and obesity: A strong association in women, but not in men ?en
dc.typeArticle accepté pour publication ou publié
dc.contributor.editoruniversityotherCERMES-INSERM;France
dc.contributor.editoruniversityotherINED;France
dc.description.abstractenThis study investigates the relation between early life conditions and adult obesity in France, using a rich data set collected through the 2003 nationally representative Life History Survey. No salient factor emerged in men, while in women, after controlling for current socio-demographic characteristics, a relation was found between obesity and the following factors: father’s occupation (OR ¼ 3.2 for women whose father was a clerical worker, versus those whose father was in a higher-level occupation); experience of economic hardship in childhood (OR ¼ 2.0), and; high parity (OR ¼ 2.1 for parities of more than 3 versus parity of 1). Neither early family history nor mother’s working status surfaced as significant factors. Those findings highlight a definite gender pattern, with a strong association between early disadvantage and obesity in women, but not in men. Potential mechanisms are discussed, particularly the ‘‘habitus’’, the ‘‘thrifty phenotype’’ and the ‘‘feast–famine’’ hypotheses, and possible interactions with childbearing and motherhood. An integration of social and biological perspectives is needed to reach a better understanding of the processes involved, and to achieve progress in primary and secondary prevention.en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlnameSocial Science and Medicine
dc.relation.isversionofjnlvol68en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlissue9en
dc.relation.isversionofjnldate2009
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpages1692-1699en
dc.relation.isversionofdoihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2009.02.024en
dc.description.sponsorshipprivateouien
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpublisherElsevieren
dc.subject.ddclabelEconomie socialeen


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