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hal.structure.identifierParis School of Economics [PSE]
dc.contributor.authorHarrigan, James
hal.structure.identifierCentre d'Etudes Prospectives et d'Informations Internationales [CEPII]
hal.structure.identifierParis School of Economics [PSE]
dc.contributor.authorReshef, Ariell
hal.structure.identifierCentre d'économie de la Sorbonne [CES]
hal.structure.identifierCentre d'Etudes Prospectives et d'Informations Internationales [CEPII]
hal.structure.identifierCenter for Economic Policy Research [CEPR]
dc.contributor.authorToubal, Farid
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-27T13:52:29Z
dc.date.available2021-09-27T13:52:29Z
dc.date.issued2021-12
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.psl.eu/handle/123456789/21842
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectGlobalizationen
dc.subjectICTen
dc.subjectlabor demanden
dc.subjectOutsourcingen
dc.subjectproductivityen
dc.subjectR&Den
dc.subjectskill augmentingen
dc.subjectSkill biasen
dc.subjectSTEM skillsen
dc.subjecttechiesen
dc.subject.ddc331en
dc.subject.classificationjelO52en
dc.subject.classificationjelJ24en
dc.subject.classificationjelJ23en
dc.subject.classificationjelF66en
dc.subject.classificationjelF16en
dc.subject.classificationjelD24en
dc.titleTechies, Trade, and Skill-Biased Productivityen
dc.typeDocument de travail / Working paper
dc.contributor.editoruniversityotherUniversity of Virginia;United States
dc.description.abstractenWe study the impact of firm-level choices on ICT, R&D, exporting and importing on the evolution of productivity, its bias towards skilled workers, and implications for labor demand. We use a novel measure of firm-level R&D and ICT adoption: employment of "techies" who perform these tasks. We develop methodology for estimating nested-CES production functions and for measuring both Hicks-neutral and skill-augmenting technology differences at the firm level. Using administrative data on French firms we find that techies, exporting and importing raise skill-biased productivity. In contrast, only ICT techies raise Hicks-neutral productivity. On average, higher firm-level skill biased productivity hardly affects low-skill employment, even as it raises relative demand for skill, due to the cost-reducing effect. ICT accounts for large increases in aggregate demand for skill, mostly due to the effect on firm size, less so through within-firm changes. Exporting, importing, and R&D have smaller aggregate effects.en
dc.publisher.nameCentre for Economic Policy Researchen
dc.identifier.citationpages68en
dc.relation.ispartofseriestitleCEPR Discussion papersen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesnumber15815en
dc.subject.ddclabelEconomie du travailen
dc.description.ssrncandidatenon
dc.description.halcandidateouien
dc.description.readershiprechercheen
dc.description.audienceInternationalen
dc.date.updated2021-09-21T14:07:04Z
hal.identifierhal-03355922
hal.version1
dc.subject.classificationjelHALO.O5.O52en
dc.subject.classificationjelHALJ.J2.J24en
dc.subject.classificationjelHALJ.J2.J23en
dc.subject.classificationjelHALF.F6.F66en
dc.subject.classificationjelHALF.F1.F16en
dc.subject.classificationjelHALD.D2.D24en
hal.date.transferred2021-09-27T13:52:31Z
hal.author.functionaut
hal.author.functionaut
hal.author.functionaut


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