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hal.structure.identifierDauphine Recherches en Management [DRM]
dc.contributor.authorYousfi, Hèla
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-22T12:46:46Z
dc.date.available2021-09-22T12:46:46Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1350-5084
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.psl.eu/handle/123456789/21795
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectArab Springen
dc.subjectsocial movement theoryen
dc.subjecttrade unionsen
dc.subjectTunisiaen
dc.subjectUGTTen
dc.subject.ddc303en
dc.subject.classificationjelJ.J5.J51en
dc.subject.classificationjelN.N4.N47en
dc.titleOrganization and organizing in revolutionary times: The case of Tunisian General Labor Unionen
dc.typeArticle accepté pour publication ou publié
dc.description.abstractenAdopting Barker’s (2011) Marxist approach of a social movement “as a whole”, this article addresses the question of whether and how mass-membership movement organizations can break out of oligarchic authority and support a radical political protest movement. Using an ethnographic approach, this article explores how the UGTT (the Tunisian General Labor Union) responded to organizational challenges during the Tunisian popular uprising in 2010 by examining its intra-organizational processes as well as its interactions with other parts of the protest movement and how their struggles mutually aided the fall of Ben Ali’s regime. The findings highlight that two correlated aspects were critical to a radical transformation of UGTT’s conservative goal. First, unionists with activism experience outside the labor organization played a key role as “mediators,” deriving meaning from the organizational culture of the union to interpret the course of the event, supporting the popular uprising, and forcing the union leadership to join the revolutionary process. Second, the unpredictable and unprecedented regime repression radicalized the protest movement and its claims, and ruptured the union’s traditional bureaucracy. The article concludes by elaborating on the potential of organizational studies to help us understand the role of trade unions in protest movement organizing and, more broadly, the role of formal mass-membership organizations in social movements.en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlnameOrganization
dc.relation.isversionofjnldate2021
dc.relation.isversionofdoi10.1177/13505084211020186en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpublisherSageen
dc.subject.ddclabelConflits sociauxen
dc.relation.forthcomingouien
dc.description.ssrncandidatenon
dc.description.halcandidateouien
dc.description.readershiprechercheen
dc.description.audienceInternationalen
dc.relation.Isversionofjnlpeerreviewedouien
dc.date.updated2021-09-21T10:44:11Z
hal.identifierhal-03351605
hal.version1
dc.subject.classificationjelHALJ - Labor and Demographic Economics::J5 - Labor–Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining::J51 - Trade Unions: Objectives, Structure, and Effectsen
dc.subject.classificationjelHALN - Economic History::N4 - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation::N47 - Africa; Oceaniaen
hal.date.transferred2021-09-22T12:46:47Z
hal.author.functionaut


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