Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAdam, Cécile
dc.contributor.authorFortané, Nicolas
dc.contributor.authorCoviglio, Alexandra
dc.contributor.authorDelesalle, Léa
dc.contributor.authorDucrot, Christian
dc.contributor.authorPaul, Mathilde
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-03T09:46:29Z
dc.date.available2020-02-03T09:46:29Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1746-6148
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/20513
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectRisk factoren
dc.subjectAntibioticen
dc.subjectPharmaco-epidemiologyen
dc.subjectPoultryen
dc.subjectCase-control studyen
dc.subject.ddc350en
dc.titleEpidemiological assessment of the factors associated with antimicrobial use in French free-range broilersen
dc.typeArticle accepté pour publication ou publié
dc.description.abstractenBackground: Although the poultry sector accounts for a major portion of global antimicrobial consumption, few studies have explored the factors which influence antimicrobial use (AMU) in poultry farms in Europe. We performed a matched case-control study in traditional free-range broiler farms in France during 2016 to evaluate the effect of technical factors and farmers’ perceptions of health problems on the probability of AMU. In total, 52 cases (defined as flocks treated with antimicrobials when chickens were between 1 and 42 days old), were included. Another 208 controls (untreated flocks the same ages as the case flocks), were randomly selected and paired with amatching case (same farmer organization and placement date). On-farm questionnaires were administered. Multivariable logistic regression modeling was conducted; seven variables were significant in the final model. Results: Two factors were associated with a lower probability of AMU: the use of chicken paper topped with starter feed (OR = 0.3; 95% CI = [0.1; 0.9]) and the use of herbal drugs as a prophylaxis (OR = 0.1; 95% CI = [0.01; 0.5]). A higher probability of AMU was associated with farmers perceiving the cumulative mortality of chicks between 1and 10 days old as normal (OR = 10.1; 95% CI = [1.7; 59]) or high (OR = 58.7; 95% CI = [9.6; 372.3]). A higher probability of AMU also was associated with farmers detecting a health problem (OR = 12.5, 95% CI = [4.2; 36.9]) and phone calls between farmers and their technicians (OR = 5.9; 95% CI = [2.3; 14.8]) when chicks are between 11 to 42 days old. Two additional factors (litter thickness and cleaning/disinfecting) were significant and highlighted the importance of technical factors such as biosecurity. Conclusions: Our results suggest that to reduce AMU, technical training should be provided to farmers to improve how farms are monitored and to reinforce preventive health measures. Training also should address how farmers assess warning criteria like daily mortality rates, which when overestimated often lead to antimicrobial treatment.en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlnameBMC Veterinary Research
dc.relation.isversionofjnlvol15en
dc.relation.isversionofjnldate2019
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpagesn°219en
dc.relation.isversionofdoi10.1186/s12917-019-1970-1en
dc.identifier.urlsitehttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12917-019-1970-1en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpublisherSpringeren
dc.subject.ddclabelAdministrationen
dc.relation.forthcomingnonen
dc.relation.forthcomingprintnonen
dc.description.ssrncandidatenonen
dc.description.halcandidatenonen
dc.description.readershiprechercheen
dc.description.audienceInternationalen
dc.relation.Isversionofjnlpeerreviewednonen
dc.relation.Isversionofjnlpeerreviewednonen
dc.date.updated2019-12-19T13:25:49Z
hal.person.labIds37937
hal.person.labIds184082
hal.person.labIds37937
hal.person.labIds37937
hal.person.labIds92968
hal.person.labIds37937


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record