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dc.contributor.authorCharnock, Ross
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-14T15:02:18Z
dc.date.available2009-09-14T15:02:18Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/1613
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectLinguistique Droiten
dc.subject.ddc410en
dc.titleClear ambiguity: the Interpretation of Plain Language in English Legal Judgmentsen
dc.typeChapitre d'ouvrage
dc.description.abstractenIt is inevitable in a complex discipline, that expression should sometimes appear obscure. In the legal field it is agreed that such obscurity should be reduced to a minimum. However, the avoidance of (unnecessary) obscurity will not eliminate problems of interpretation. It is shown that problems of ambiguity may arise even where the language is clear. A study of celebrated English cases shows that common words are more ambiguous than specialised terms. It is argued that, because “what is said” is not determined (merely) by the words, but also depends on the context of discourse, there can be no purely literal meaning. Where the contextual features are unavailable or inadmissible, the sense may appear indeterminate. A consideration of the classical rules of legal construction as applied in common law judgments shows that although ambiguity is an integral part of the law, it may be seen not as a defect, but as an essential tool of adjudication.en
dc.identifier.citationpages65-103en
dc.relation.ispartoftitleLegal Language and the Search for Clarity: practice and toolsen
dc.relation.ispartofeditorCacciaguidi-Fahy, Sophie
dc.relation.ispartofeditorWagner, Anne
dc.relation.ispartofpublnamePeter Langen
dc.relation.ispartofpublcityBerneen
dc.relation.ispartofdate2006
dc.relation.ispartofpages493en
dc.description.sponsorshipprivateouien
dc.subject.ddclabelLinguistiqueen
dc.relation.ispartofisbn3-03-911169-8en


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