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dc.contributor.authorBessière, Céline*
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-09T14:13:55Z
dc.date.available2014-10-09T14:13:55Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/14023
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectunpaid worken
dc.subjectconjugal relationshipen
dc.subjectfamily businessen
dc.subjectentrepreneurshipen
dc.subjectgenderen
dc.subjectInégalité des genresen
dc.subjectRapport masculin/fémininen
dc.subjectEconomie domestiqueen
dc.subjectEntreprises familialesen
dc.subjectÉtudes sur le genreen
dc.subjectEtablissements vinicolesen
dc.subjectExploitations agricolesen
dc.subjectSociologie de l'agricultureen
dc.subject.ddc306.3en
dc.titleFemale and male domestic partners in wine-grape farms (Cognac, France): conjugal asymmetry and gender discrimination in family businessesen
dc.typeArticle accepté pour publication ou publié
dc.description.abstractenAgriculture in contemporary France is dominated by family businesses. On Cognac wine-grape farms, training for the occupation and taking over the business is the result of parents' efforts to socialize one (or more) of their children. This long-term socialization varies by gender. Farm property, professional skills, and the status of business head are in most cases transmitted to male heirs. Female heirs suffer discrimination in their families. If they have one or more brothers, their families take it as a given that a male heir ought to inherit the farm, and that female heirs are ‘not interested.’ To elucidate these phenomena, I will compare two asymmetrical situations, ‘ordinary cases’ – when a male heir heads the grape-growing business – vs. ‘exceptional cases,’ when a female heir is farm head. For the first, I will show that female domestic partners' off-farm salaried labor does not put an end to on-farm productive or financial cooperation in the couple. For the second situation, I show that male domestic partners, working on or off the farm, are always problematic, presenting another obstacle for women wishing to take over a family grape-growing business. By focusing analysis on the asymmetry of female and male domestic partners in family businesses, this article thus makes an empirical contribution to knowledge of discrimination against female business heads.en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlnameThe History of the Family
dc.relation.isversionofjnlvol19en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlissue3en
dc.relation.isversionofjnldate2014
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpages341-357en
dc.relation.isversionofdoi10.1080/1081602X.2014.934880en
dc.subject.ddclabelSociologie économiqueen
dc.relation.forthcomingnonen
dc.relation.forthcomingprintnonen
dc.description.halcandidateoui
dc.description.readershiprecherche
dc.description.audienceInternational
dc.relation.Isversionofjnlpeerreviewedoui
hal.person.labIds95415*
hal.identifierhal-01519237*


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