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dc.contributor.authorPezé, Stéphan
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-21T14:08:25Z
dc.date.available2014-07-21T14:08:25Z
dc.date.issued2013-08
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/13757
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCadres (personnel)en
dc.subjectFormationen
dc.subjectIdentité professionnelleen
dc.subjectManagerial trainingen
dc.subjectMicro-practicesen
dc.subjectIdentity worken
dc.subjectIdentity regulationen
dc.subject.ddc658.3en
dc.subject.classificationjelJ24en
dc.subject.classificationjelM12en
dc.subject.classificationjelM54en
dc.titleControlling Managers' 'Becoming': The Practice of Identity Regulationen
dc.typeChapitre d'ouvrage
dc.description.abstractenThe aim of this chapter is to better understand how identity regulation – a key mode of control – is exercised within organizations. This process ‘encompasses the more or less intentional effects of social practices upon processes of identity construction and reconstruction’ (Alvesson & Willmott, 2002, p. 625). It is mainly constituted by the discursive practices that allow identity definition to prompt identity work, a form of more or less conscious self-work that is aimed at ‘forming, repairing, maintaining, strengthening or revising the constructions that are productive of a precarious sense of coherence and distinctiveness’ (Alvesson & Willmott, 2002, p. 626). Thus identity-regulation forms, along with identity work, the basis of identity construction – the process of ‘becoming’. To date, several studies have provided strong evidence of organizational discourses’ influence on individuals’ identity work and identity (e.g. Ainsworth & Hardy, 2009; Alvesson & Robertson, 2006; Sveningsson & Alvesson, 2003; Thomas & Linstead, 2002), despite the fact that this influence is only partial due to both conflicting and incomplete discourses and to the inescapable individual agency (Thomas & Linstead, 2002) that is exercised through identity work. Nevertheless, in spite of these valuable insights, we lack an understanding of the basic practices that support (and sometimes fail) to achieve identity regulation – that is, the critical operation that consists of the linking of discourses to identity (Alvesson & Willmott, 2002, p. 628). To better comprehend this new mode of control, we need to know how identity regulation is performed through individuals’ concrete actions.en
dc.identifier.citationpages240-260en
dc.relation.ispartoftitleMateriality and Space. Organizations, Artefacts and Practicesen
dc.relation.ispartofeditorde Vaujany, François-Xavier
dc.relation.ispartofeditorMitev, Nathalie
dc.relation.ispartofpublnamePalgrave Macmillanen
dc.relation.ispartofpublcityHoundmills, Basingstoke, Hampshireen
dc.relation.ispartofdate2013-08
dc.relation.ispartofpagesXXIV-361en
dc.relation.ispartofurlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1057/9781137304094en
dc.subject.ddclabelRessources humainesen
dc.relation.ispartofisbn978-1-137-30408-7en
dc.relation.forthcomingnonen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1057/9781137304094.0022en


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