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dc.contributor.authorLe Bianic, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorEvetts, Julia
dc.contributor.authorBourgeault, Ivy Lynn
dc.contributor.authorAllsop, Judith
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-27T08:04:32Z
dc.date.available2009-07-27T08:04:32Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/1369
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectPsychologistsen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectGlobalizationen
dc.subjectEngineersen
dc.subjectCross country comparisonen
dc.subject.ddc306.3en
dc.subject.classificationjelJ38en
dc.titleEncountering Globalization:Professional Groups in an International Contexten
dc.typeArticle accepté pour publication ou publié
dc.contributor.editoruniversityotherUniversité Paris-Dauphine;France
dc.contributor.editoruniversityotherUniversity of Nottingham;Royaume-Uni
dc.contributor.editoruniversityotherMcMaster University;Canada
dc.contributor.editoruniversityotherUniversity of Lincoln;Royaume-Uni
dc.description.abstractenThe market for professional services is increasingly international but comparisons have not been made between different professions nor on how state policies affect opportunities for mobility. This article considers three professions: engineers, physicians and psychologists and explores the similarities and differences in international labour market demand for occupations. It examines how state policies in four countries, Canada, Finland, France and the UK, aim to promote and control professional labour mobility and migration, and the differences across the three professions. Engineering is an international profession and the extent to which states encourage inward migration differs. Medicine is highly regulated in all four countries but inward migration of physicians varies depending on national policy. Psychologists are less mobile, and the extent of state sponsorship and regulation varies across countries. In all three professions, international organizations are a force encouraging global standards. The conclusion is that state policies reflect state interests and have a strong influence on patterns of mobility.en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlnameCurrent Sociology
dc.relation.isversionofjnlvol57en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlissue4en
dc.relation.isversionofjnldate2009-07
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpages487-510en
dc.relation.isversionofdoihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0011392109104351
dc.description.sponsorshipprivateouien
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpublisherSageen
dc.subject.ddclabelSociologie économiqueen


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