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dc.contributor.authorGonand, Frédéric*
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-27T08:56:09Z
dc.date.available2014-01-27T08:56:09Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/12507
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectEnergy transitionen
dc.subjectintergenerational redistributionen
dc.subjectoverlapping generationsen
dc.subjectfiscal consolidationen
dc.subjectgeneral equilibriumen
dc.subject.ddc333en
dc.subject.classificationjelD.D5.D58en
dc.subject.classificationjelD.D6.D63en
dc.subject.classificationjelE.E6.E62en
dc.subject.classificationjelL.L7.L70en
dc.subject.classificationjelQ.Q2.Q28en
dc.subject.classificationjelQ.Q4.Q43en
dc.titleDynamic Impacts on Growth and Intergenerational Effects of Energy Transition in a Time of Fiscal Consolidationen
dc.typeDocument de travail / Working paper
dc.description.abstractenSocial planners in most western countries will be facing two long-lasting challenges in the next years: energy transition and fiscal consolidation. One problem is that governments might consider that implementing an energy transition could get i n the way of achieving a fiscal consolidation. If so, interrupting the energy transition in a time of fiscal consolidation would involve significant aggregate impacts on activity and inter generational redistributive effects. This article tries to assess them empirically. It relies on an overlapping-generations framework in a general equilibrium setting, with a detailed energy module. The model is parameterized on data provided by OECD/IEA for France. Different results emerge. Renouncing to the energy transition would slightly foster the level of GDP during the next 10 to 15 years - depending on the dynamics of the prices of fossil fuels on world markets - but weigh on it more significantly afterwards (up to -1% in 2050). If the pric es of fossil fuels keep increasing in the future, implementing an energy transition could have br oadly the same favourable effects on the GDP level in the long run as those of a fiscal consolidation diminishing significantly public spending instead of raising taxes. In the long-run, the GDP would be maximized by implementing an energy transition and simultaneously lessening the public deficit by lowering some public expenditure, a policy that would entail an overall gain of around 1,6% of GDP in 2050. Stopping the energy transition would also bring about intergenerational issues. It would be detrimental to the intertemporal wellbeing of almost all cohorts alive in 2010. A fiscal policy with lower public expenditures and frozen tax rates may be still more favourable to young and future generations than implementing an energy transition. However, renouncing to an energy transition would annihilate most of these pro-youth effects.en
dc.publisher.nameUniversité Paris Dauphineen
dc.publisher.cityParisen
dc.identifier.citationpages52en
dc.relation.ispartofseriestitleLes Cahiers de la Chaire Economie du Climaten
dc.relation.ispartofseriesnumber2014 - 01en
dc.subject.ddclabelEconomie de la terre et des ressources naturellesen
dc.description.submittednonen
dc.description.halcandidateoui
dc.description.readershiprecherche
dc.description.audienceInternational
hal.person.labIds255365$$$191547*
hal.identifierhal-01521866*


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