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dc.contributor.authorGroenewegen, Peter P.
dc.contributor.authorDourgnon, Paul
dc.contributor.authorGress, Stefan
dc.contributor.authorJurgutis, Arnoldas
dc.contributor.authorWillems, Sara
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-03T09:22:15Z
dc.date.available2013-12-03T09:22:15Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/12226
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectPrimary careen
dc.subjectInternational comparisonen
dc.subjectHealth policyen
dc.subject.ddc334en
dc.subject.classificationjelI11en
dc.subject.classificationjelI18en
dc.titleStrengthening weak primary care systems: Steps towards stronger primary care in selected Western and Eastern European countriesen
dc.typeArticle accepté pour publication ou publié
dc.contributor.editoruniversityotherGhent University;Belgique
dc.contributor.editoruniversityotherKlaipėda University;Lituanie
dc.contributor.editoruniversityotherUniversity of Applied Sciences Fulda;Allemagne
dc.contributor.editoruniversityotherUtrecht University;Pays-Bas
dc.description.abstractenEuropean health care systems are facing diverse challenges. In health policy, strong primary care is seen as key to deal with these challenges. European countries differ in how strong their primary care systems are. Two groups of traditionally weak primary care systems are distinguished. First a number of social health insurance systems in Western Europe. In these systems we identified policies to strengthen primary care by small steps, characterized by weak incentives and a voluntary basis for primary care providers and patients. Secondly, transitional countries in Central and Eastern Europe (CCEE) that transformed their state-run, polyclinic based systems to general practice based systems to a varying extent. In this policy review article we describe the policies to strengthen primary care. For Western Europe, Germany, Belgium and France are described. The CCEE transformed their systems in a completely different context and urgency of problems. For this group, we describe the situation in Estonia and Lithuania, as former states of the Soviet Union that are now members of the EU, and Belarus which is not. We discuss the usefulness of voluntary approaches in the context of acceptability of such policies and in the context of (absence of) European policies.en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlnameHealth Policy
dc.relation.isversionofjnlvol113en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlissue1-2en
dc.relation.isversionofjnldate2013
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpages170-179en
dc.relation.isversionofdoihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.healthpol.2013.05.024en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpublisherElsevieren
dc.subject.ddclabelEconomie socialeen
dc.relation.forthcomingnonen
dc.relation.forthcomingprintnonen


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