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dc.contributor.authorChauvet, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorGubert, Flore
dc.contributor.authorMesplé-Somps, Sandrine
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-13T13:54:38Z
dc.date.available2012-12-13T13:54:38Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/10707
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectForeign Aid
dc.subjectInternational Migration
dc.subjectRemittances
dc.subjectChild Health
dc.subject.ddc338.9en
dc.subject.classificationjelF24en
dc.subject.classificationjelF22en
dc.subject.classificationjelF35en
dc.subject.classificationjelI10en
dc.subject.classificationjelO15en
dc.titleAre Remittances More Effective Than Aid To Improve Child Health? An Empirical Assessment using Inter and Intra-Country Data
dc.typeCommunication / Conférence
dc.description.abstractenThe objective of the paper is to analyze the respective impact of aid and remittances onhuman development as measured by infant and child mortality rates and stunting incidence.Panel data on a sample of 98 developing countries, and cross-country quintile-level data on asample of 47 developing countries are alternatively used. In addition to assessing the extentto which health aid and remittances contribute to reduce child health disparities betweencountries, the paper addresses two other questions. What is the net effect of migration whenthe brain drain of health workers is accounted for? What is the effective impact of aid andremittances on intra-country child health disparities? Our results suggest that bothremittances and health aid significantly improve child health outcomes. The impact of healthaid is non-linear, though, suggesting that aid to the health sector is more effective in thepoorest countries. By contrast, medical brain drain, as measured by the expatriation rate ofphysicians, is found to have a harmful impact on health outcomes. The net impact ofmigration on human development is therefore mitigated. Medical brain drain is also found toreduce the effectiveness of health aid. Last, remittances seem to be much more effective in improving health outcomes for children belonging to the richest households, whereas neither pro-poor nor anti-poor effect is found for health aid.
dc.subject.ddclabelCroissance et développement économiquesen
dc.relation.conftitleAnnual Bank Conference on Development Economics
dc.relation.confcityCape Town
dc.relation.confcountrySOUTH AFRICA
dc.relation.forthcomingnonen
dc.description.ssrncandidatenon
dc.description.halcandidateoui
dc.description.readershiprecherche
dc.description.audienceinternational
dc.date.updated2016-02-18T08:46:21Z


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